“We have been given the opportunity to express our pent-up anger towards the regime by saying ‘no’” – Harout Ouloyan

I will not discuss the aims of constitutional change as presented to us since by doing so I would be forced to enter the field of predictions, guessing and weighing the clauses involved, and this would only serve the interests of the regime. 

For me specifically (and I’m sure for many others), the main reasons to say “no” to constitutional change are: 

  • The organized murder of ordinary citizens perpetrated by the regime on March 1, 2008. 
  • The daily violation of the current constitution by the regime. 
  • The years of continuously falsifying all elections in Arena. 
  • Armenia’s foreign policy that has become a mockery. The miserable failure of football diplomacy; even at the cost of forsaking the Genocide. 
  • The clear defeatist policy vis-à-vis Artsakh, peppered with absurdly cynical statements. 

And on and on… 

Harout Ouloyan, Activist
Harout Ouloyan, Activist

Without going into details, let me just add that each of the above reasons is sufficient to say “no”. To regard any decision by a regime guilty of such crimes as a reform is not only naive but ‘guilt by association’. 

On December 6, we have been given the opportunity to express our pent-up anger towards the regime by saying ‘no’. Our ‘no’ vote will be directed not only to the proposed changes to the constitution , but first and foremost, to the regime headed by Serzh Sargsyan. 

Say ‘no’, you can do it. 

Say ‘no’, and you will triumph.